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White House is Planning an Attack on Kavanaugh Accuser, Christine Blasey Ford



Source: Wikimedia Commons, per Twitter

Yesterday, Christine Blasey Ford came forward as the alleged sexual assault victim of President Trump’s recent Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Ford, a professor in clinical psychology at Palo Alto University, reluctantly came forward to tell her story, ultimately changing her life forever.  While Chuck Grassley released a statement saying that it’s “disturbing that these uncorroborated allegations” have been released just now, fact is, the allegations have actually been partially corroborated.

Ford recounted the incident in couples therapy back in 2012, while her therapist jotted down notes, indicating that she didn’t just come forward with these allegation after Kavanaugh was nominated.  Ford has also passed a polygraph test which was administered by a former FBI agent last month.

With Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation still in the balance, Republicans on the hill and in Trump’s White House are scurrying to try to discredit Ford’s story the best they can.

According to Bloomberg News, who spoke to a White House official, President Trump’s team will continue forward with the nomination, refusing to pull Kavanaugh’s name from the nomination, and instead they will try to attack the credibility of the alleged victim.

The White House official says that the Trump administration will try its best to discredit the allegations, pointing out the fact that they were made so late in the confirmation process and so many years after the alleged crime occurred.  They also plan to question Ford’s credibility and point out that she did not tell anyone about the incident when it first happened.

According to Beverly Engel L.M.F.T., who has been a practicing psychotherapist for thirty-five years, it is very common for women not to come forward right after they have been sexually assaulted or harassed.  There are many elements and theories as to why this is the case, but it is a known fact that women tend to stray away from pointing fingers in the days, weeks, months and even years after becoming a victim.

Some of these reasons as to why women tend to hold back their accusations for different lengths of time, have been outlined by Engel. They include: shame, denial, minimization, fear of the consequences, low self-esteem, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, lack of information, disbelief.

Instead of fully investigating the matter, and what may have been a horrific crime by a man who is about to be confirmed to the highest court in the nation, Republicans on the hill and in the White House, instead appear to be planning to embarrass and attack the alleged victim even more.