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WATCH: Women In Handmaid’s Tale Attire Fight In Solidarity With Texas — Here’s How To Help

The Boston Red Cloaks are a group of activists fighting to protect access to abortion as a necessary reproductive health care service in the United States. Over the weekend, they held a march in solidarity with Texas, after the Supreme Court allowed a law in the state to stand, banning abortions after 6 weeks gestation.

[Image via Boston Red Cloaks/Twitter]

At 6 weeks gestation, many people aren’t even aware yet that they’re pregnant. This law makes abortion instantly inaccessible to those women, even those who have the privilege of ready access to funds, transportation, and other means necessary to acquire one. The Supreme Court’s decision to leave the law in place was a shock to reproductive rights advocates — but not necessarily really a surprise. They’ve been warning about imminent danger to these rights, and this law — which even enables targeting of anyone suspected of obtaining, providing, or helping anyone else obtain an abortion, as NPR reports here:

The law allows private citizens to sue abortion providers and anyone else who helps a woman obtain an abortion — including those who give a woman a ride to a clinic or provide financial assistance to obtain an abortion. Private citizens who bring these suits don’t need to show any connection to those they are suing.

The law makes no exceptions for cases involving rape or incest.

The Boston Red Cloaks marched this weekend in protest and solidarity — but their purpose wasn’t just a striking visual display to call attention to the law.

They’re fighting for action.

One way to combat this law, and the others like it that are being drawn up right now, is through Federal protection of reproductive rights, so that every pregnant person is assured the medical privacy and reproductive freedom championed in the Roe v. Wade decision.

To that end, the Boston Red Cloaks are asking that everyone contact their elected representatives and demand passage of the Women’s Reproductive Health Act.



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