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[WATCH] Search & Rescue Efforts Underway After Ida Slams Louisiana

Ida is no longer a hurricane, but it continues to leave a path of damage. The tropical storm is moving over southwestern Mississippi and a threat of flooding remains in some parts of Louisiana. Slamming into New Orleans on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Ida is tied with 2020’s Hurricane Laura and the Last Island Hurricane of 1856 as the strongest ever to hit the state. More than one million people in Louisiana and Mississippi were without power. At least two people were killed, but with local rescue efforts underway, that number is expected to rise.

The Category 4 storm has now been downgraded and is expected to continue weakening as it moves over land with a predicted track taking it north into the central United States before veering eastward, reaching the mid-Atlantic region by Wednesday. President Joe Biden had described Ida as “life-threatening” and declared Louisiana a disaster area.

Monday, Aug. 20, 2021 – Dartanian Stovall looks at the house that collapsed with him inside during the height of Hurricane Ida in New Orleans. Stovall was inside the house he was renovating on Lasalle Street in the Uptown neighborhood when he said the chimney collapsed the rest of the house followed. He managed to crawl to safety and despite the loss of the home said, “At least I’m alive.”

Louisiana hospitals in Ida’s path were forced to evacuate dozens of patients after the storm left them with pieces torn off their roofs and water leaking down walls to pool on floors as they relied on emergency generators for electricity. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) said four Louisiana hospitals suffered damage from Ida, and 39 medical facilities were running on generator power. FEMA included the figures in a public memo Monday. It did not specify which hospitals sustained damage. Five Louisiana hospitals had evacuated their patients or were planning to do so Monday.

MSNBC covered the search and rescue efforts on Monday. Watch the full segment, below.



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