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Twitter Users Excoriate White House’s Tone Deaf Song Selection at Ohio Trump Event

Does the White House know that the coronavirus pandemic – which has killed more than 160,000 Americans – is still a thing? Because the music it decided to blast before President Donald Trump took to the podium at a Whirlpool factory in Ohio on Thursday suggests otherwise.

The song of choice? The Guns N’ Roses’ cover of Paul McCartney and Wings’ “Live and Let Die.” The moment was recorded and posted to Twitter by The Intercept’s Robert Mackey.

Embed from Getty Images

“The White House is playing “Live and Let Die” before Trump’s arrival at a thinly disguised campaign event in Ohio that the state’s governor cannot attend because he just came down with Covid-19, the disease that killed over 1,400 Americans yesterday,” Mackey wrote.

Watch the video below:

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine (R) received a positive coronavirus test on Thursday ahead of Trump’s visit but a second test to confirm the diagnosis came back negative. There are more than 97,000 recorded cases of COVID-19 in the Buckeye State and 3,618 deaths.

Mackey’s tweet spread like wildfire on Twitter.

How low can they go?

One user noted that the same song was played when Trump visited a Honeywell factory in Arizona.

This guy gets it.

Preceding the callous indifference on display in Ohio, Trump boasted to Geraldo Rivera about what an “unbelievable job” he believes he has done in combating the pandemic.

“Looking back on this awful plague that’s now killed almost 160,000 Americans, there were some missteps. Don’t you wish you had done some things differently?” Rivera asked the president.

Predictably, someone else is to blame.

“First of all, the governors run their states — you understand that,” Trump replied. “That’s the way it’s set up and that’s the way it’s supposed to be… We’ve had some great governors, and we’ve had some governors that didn’t do as well.”

Rivera pushed a little harder. “So you don’t admit any missteps?”

This is Trump, after all, so his response was no surprise.

“I guess you could say that people call things wrong,” he said. “But it’s understandable. Nobody knew what this disease was… But no, I think we’ve done an unbelievable job.”



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