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Trump’s White House falsely accused Britain of helping Obama spy and now they won’t apologize



The White House is in damage control (as it has been every day since Trump took office), this time focusing on its deteriorating relationships with Britain brought about by false international wiretapping claims.

Trump’s administration attempted this week to claim that President Barack Obama used London’s spy agency to conduct secret surveillance on President Trump while he was still running for office in late 2016.

“We’ve made clear to the administration that these claims are ridiculous and should be ignored,” the spokesman said on condition of anonymity in keeping with British protocol. “We’ve received assurances these allegations won’t be repeated,” a spokesman for Prime Minister Theresa May said on Friday.

Immediately following the ridiculous claim, British officials said they had no part in the completely fabricated wiretapping story.

Kim Darroch, the British ambassador to Washington, spoke with Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, at a St. Patrick’s Day reception in Washington on Thursday night. The conversation occurred just hours after Spicer made the laughable claims.

Mark Lyall Grant, the prime minister’s national security adviser, spoke separately with his American counterpart, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster.

“Ambassador Kim Darroch and Sir Mark Lyall expressed their concerns to Sean Spicer and General McMaster,” a White House official said. “Mr. Spicer and General McMaster explained that Mr. Spicer was simply pointing to public reports, not endorsing any specific story.”

The Trump administration has made a habit of citing Breitbart and other far-right leaning fake news websites as credible sources, even when the publications have provided so proof of its accusations.

A White House official spoke with The New York Times and said Mr. Spicer offered no regret to the ambassador. “He didn’t apologize, no way, no how.”

Representative Tom Cole, Republican of Oklahoma, said Friday that Mr. Trump should immediately issue an apology to President Obama.

“Frankly, unless you can produce some pretty compelling truth, I think President Obama is owed an apology,” Mr. Cole told reporters. “If he didn’t do it, we shouldn’t be reckless in accusations that he did.”

Sean Spicer on Thursday quoted Fox News coverage implicating Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters in a wiretapping of Trump Tower. At the time, he said Trump stands by his original wiretapping claims, despite outright denial by the intelligence community and various investigations into the President’s claims.

Welcome to the Red State…