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Trump Threatens to Veto Defense Policy Bill Over Social Media Protections

Donald Trump has repeatedly shown that he cares more about his Twitter feed than the American people over the last four years, and as he slogs through his lame duck period, he’s been tweeting constantly in an attempt to keep his fanbase under the delusion that he will indeed overturn the election and remain in power another four years. As he faces the real loss of his freedom once he’s out of office, Trump is using his last few weeks to scorch all the earth he can, constantly tweeting unsubstantiated accusations of fraud and vote tampering.

Twitter has at least stepped up and now adds disclaimers to every misleading Trump tweet, which has only served to enrage him more. An angry Trump is also a spiteful one, and he’s taken yet another step to make sure Joe Biden enters the White House in the deepest political hole possible. Trump is now threatening to veto an important defense policy bill just because his feelings are hurt over those extra details (such as “This claim about election fraud is disputed”) attached to his tweets.

Yes, really.

On Twitter Tuesday night, Trump took aim at Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act, which protects companies that can host trillions of messages from being sued into oblivion by anyone who feels wronged by something someone else has posted, whether their complaint is legitimate or not. In October he signed an executive order directing executive branch agencies to ask independent rule-making agencies, including the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission, to study whether they can place new regulations on the companies.

Trump called Section 230 “a serious threat to our National Security & Election Integrity,” adding, “Therefore, if the very dangerous & unfair Section 230 is not completely terminated as part of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), I will be forced to unequivocally VETO the Bill.”

The veto threat is another potential roadblock for the passage of the annual defense policy measure, which is already being held up in Congress by a spat over military bases named for Confederate officers. The measure, which has passed for 59 years in a row on a bipartisan basis, guides Pentagon policy and cements decisions about troop levels, new weapons systems and military readiness, military personnel policy, and other military goals.

Outgoing Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany confirmed Trump’s spiteful intentions Wednesday morning.



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