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Trump & Friends Get COVID-19 Treatments Not Available to Most

On Wednesday, just three days after Donald Trump revealed in a tweet that his personal attorney had tested positive for coronavirus, Rudy Giuliani was discharged from Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C. An energetic-sounding Giuliani made that announcement himself by calling into a New York radio talk show.

“I’m walking out of the hospital as soon as we finish this conversation,” Giuliani said. He proceeded to thank doctors at the hospital, but then added to his list of thanks the White House physician and Trump. “I’m fully taken care of … They helped a lot. They got me better in two days.”

Giuliani chalked up his remarkably fast recovery to two factors: his “celebrity” status and relationship with the president. “If it wasn’t me, I wouldn’t have been put in a hospital frankly,” he said. “Sometimes when you’re a celebrity they’re worried if something happens to you they’re going to examine it more carefully and do everything right.” He also said he took Trump’s advice to take the Regeneron therapy. “The minute I took the cocktail yesterday, I felt 100 percent better. It works very quickly, wow,” he said.

(Photo by Joshua Roberts/Getty Images)

The fact that Giuliani, Chris Christie, Ben Carson and Trump, none of who are prime physical specimens, so quickly bounced back after contracting coronavirus while non-celebrity Americans are dying at the rate of more than 3,000 a day starkly illustrates why medical ethicists say COVID-19 has become a disease of the haves and the have-nots.

“We should not have Chris Christie and Ben Carson – and in the case of Carson with intervention by the president – get access,” said Arthur Caplan, a medical ethicist, in an interview with the New York Times.

Giuliani’s candid admission on the radio comes at a time when hospitals in many parts of the U.S. are being overwhelmed by a surge in cases that is forcing them to ration ICU beds and medicines.



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