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There’s Another Whistleblower Complaint — This Time, Dealing With Trump’s Taxes

The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump has so far paid most of its attention toward an alleged action the commander-in-chief took, purportedly attempting to pressure a foreign leader to open an investigation into one of Trump’s political foes, Democratic candidate for president Joe Biden.

Photo of Pres. Donald Trump by Win McNamee/Getty Images; photo of IRS building by Zach Gibson/Getty Images

But there’s a lesser-known complaint that could soon also be on the radar of lawmakers in Washington considering the impeachment question.

Rep. Richard Neal, the chair of the House Ways and Means Committee, sent a letter in August to Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin regarding a complaint that was sent to him from a whistleblower within the Internal Revenue Service. At the time, the matter didn’t make much headway in terms of news coverage, but with the recent Ukraine whistleblower complaint being given so much attention, this other concern is being given renewed scrutiny.

Neal described the IRS whistleblower complaint as containing alleging “evidence of possible misconduct” within the bureau, Business Insider reported.

The complaint has to do with the mandatory audit process that all presidents and vice presidents are subject to. Neal and other Democrats have previously expressed worries over the process not being handled in an appropriate manner for Trump and Vice President Mike Pence. IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig called those concerns “unfounded.”

But the whistleblower’s complaints, Neal said, warrant renewed scrutiny.

“The Committee received an unsolicited communication from a Federal employee setting forth credible allegations of ‘evidence of possible misconduct’ — specifically, potential ‘inappropriate efforts to influence’ the mandatory audit program,” Neal said.

It’s unclear at this time who may have attempted to influence the program or how they tried to do so. Rep. Dan Kildee, in an interview with CNN, elaborated on the matter.

“I can’t get into the specifics of the whistleblower because that’s something Chairman Neal will have to address, but it is clear that the information that we are getting strengthens our concern and our argument that the President may not be subjected to the laws that the IRS is supposed to enforce,” Kildee explained.



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