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Photo Evidence Shows Brett Kavanaugh’s Fraternity Openly Disrespecting Women By Flying Flag of Undergarments



 

Photo credit: Yale Daily News

A damaging photograph has surfaced of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s fraternity, Delta Kappa Epsilon, flying a flag made of women’s underwear. During his time at Yale the photo was published in the Yale Daily News on January 18, 1985.

Kavanaugh was not present in the image, but his fraternity brothers were holding the flag during DKE initiation. The picture surely sets the tone for the degrading attitude the brotherhood had towards women, a seemingly relevant tidbit after the sexual assault allegations that were made against him.

Three days after the flag incident, a female student submitted a letter to the editor sharing her shock and outrage at DKE’s behavior towards women. DKE brother, Steve Gallo, suggested that women had probably volunteered the items for such activities, but Jennifer Lew, a former classmate of Kavanaugh’s, claims DKE used to rummage through their rooms and steal the personal garments.

DKE’s antics got so out of hand that the brotherhood was banned from campus for chanting “no means yes, yes means anal” at the University’s Women’s Center. The fraternity fell under investigation after the Yale Daily News and Business Insider recorded sexual abuse allegations against many of its members, including the organization’s former president.

As if the shenanigans of the DKE weren’t enough to place shade on Kavanaugh’s reputation, he also belonged to another, possibly more sinister, organization. Kavanaugh was a member of the all men secret society Truth and Courage. Their respect for women is easily perceivable by their nickname, “Tit and Clit.”

Kavanaugh has thus far denied all allegations against him of sexual assault by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. A Senate Judiciary Committee hearing is scheduled for next week. The specific details of the night in question are unclear, but the circles he traveled in throughout his formidable years certainly call into question his character.