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One America News Promotes Debunked Conspiracy Theory That Coronavirus Vaccines Make People Magnetic

The right-wing propaganda outlet One America News interviewed a woman on Thursday who claimed that the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine turned her left arm into a magnet.

Screenshot/Media Matters for America

A popular conspiracy theory stating that inoculations cause human magnetism has been thoroughly debunked. In fact, it is physically impossible, as Wired explained in a June fact-check:

I’M AFRAID WE have to talk about magnets and Covid-19 vaccines. We shouldn’t have to say anything, but apparently we do: The vaccines don’t make you magnetic. No matter what you might have seen in online videos with people hanging spoons off their faces, that spoon is clinging to them simply because metal sticks to sweaty skin. It’s a fun trick that’s as old as spoons.

In the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s list of ingredients for the three Covid vaccines given emergency use authorization in the United States, the agency specifically points out: ‘All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals such as iron, nickel, cobalt, lithium, rare earth alloys or any manufactured products such as microelectronics, electrodes, carbon nanotubes, or nanowire semiconductors.’

But the list does show that all three contain some form of sodium, including sodium chloride or sodium acetate, and one of them contains potassium chloride. Both potassium and sodium can be metals—does that mean there’s some kind of metal in there after all?

No, writes Naomi Ginsberg, an associate professor of chemistry and physics at UC Berkeley. ‘Potassium and Sodium are only metallic in solid form, but they are not solid as additives in the injected solution,’ she told WIRED in an email. ‘The individual ions are dispersed in the solution, a liquid composed of mostly water and sparse, individual potassium and sodium ions, in addition to the active components of the vaccine. The ions in this solution are basically like dissolved salts, like are in Gatorade or Pedialyte, which our body needs to work properly but which get depleted during exercise.’

And, of course, neither potassium nor sodium is ferromagnetic. They couldn’t cause a magnetic interaction with normal objects.

Yet, anchor Dan Ball and the production staff over at OAN chose to present this case as news.

A transcript and video of the bizarre conversation – which included a live demonstration and dragged on for an astonishing eight minutes – were provided by Media Matters for America.

Ball:

So there is a story out there that’s been circulating online. You may have seen it, and it got me wondering when I saw some of the videos. Cause I’m like, is this really true or not? I don’t know. Have you heard about it? I think it’s on TikTok, I’m not a big TikTok-er. It’s called the magnet challenge. And literally, thousands upon thousands of people around the world have been trying to do it, saying that if they’ve been vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine that where they got the shot in the arm, it now has become magnetic. And again, I say this with kind of a smile on my face because I still don’t know what to believe. 

Here’s some of the headlines. There’s a lot of them out there, from the Miami Herald, BBC, Reuters, USA Today, all debunking it, saying that these social media folks that are putting it on are lying. It’s fake. There’s nothing, there’s no metal, no microchip, it’s all conspiracy theories — there’s no way that getting the show would make your arm magnetic. So all the mainstream says there’s no way. OK. So I don’t know what to believe, because you hear me say all the time, I don’t believe in listening to the mainstream media, because they lie to us a lot or they spew a narrative. 

So we here at Real America wanted to do some research. We started looking at different videos out there and then someone that watches the show reached out to me and wanted us to watch their videos.

Ball aired footage of individuals who believe that they too were injected with a magnetic-inducing substance. One of them, Amelia Miller, was his guest.

Ball:

All right. Now, the young woman in that video and in in all the videos we were showing before firmly believe the shot made them magnetic. Whether people are faking this to get fame, popularity, likes, whatever, I want to get to the bottom of it, because as I always say on the program, I don’t believe in conspiracy theories, but I do believe in government cover-ups, so the young woman in that video joins us now, Amelia Miller. Lives in Northern California, she’s a pre-law and political science graduate. So, you’re an intelligent person, Amelia. I spoke to you on the phone last night for a while. You sounded very, very convincing, and that’s why I wanted to have you on the program to talk about it and show your videos while we’re talking and find out what’s going on. Because a lot of people say this is fake, this is phony. So back up and tell me a little bit of your COVID story. You got COVID but then still got the shot. Walk me through the last six months, eight months. 

Miller:

Hi, Dan, thank you for having me on. Yeah, it’s been a whirlwind. Over the past six months, I unfortunately contracted COVID December 28, 2020. From there, my health declined rapidly. I was sick for 41 days, hospitalized twice, and from there was told that I am a COVID long-hauler, so it has been a really difficult past six to eight, seven months. But from there when the vaccines started to come out, I did a lot of research and I decided to pick between the lesser of the evils, I guess you could say, because I didn’t want to get COVID again and risk possibly being hospitalized and, or dying, and I also didn’t want to have a reaction to the vaccine. Because of everything, just all the stigma around it and what’s been going on. So I chose between a lesser of the two evils and I got the two Pfizer shots. 

Ball:

Talk to me about when the first one was. You said it was June. The second one was just last month in July. How did you feel after those two shots and what occurred where you figured out things were sticking to your arm? 

Miller:

So I got the first shot, yes, in June. I had a small reaction, a little bit of clamminess, small fever, normal. Very bearable. And three weeks later, I got the second Pfizer shot and I felt OK, but within a few hours, I had a little bit of brain fog and memory loss, which I just attributed to not only my long-hauler but from the second shot. Fast forward about three weeks later, around Sunday, this past Sunday, I’m sitting in bed and I start to feel this extremely strong metallic taste in my mouth and then I recall all those videos and people that have talked about it and I didn’t believe it at all. I didn’t believe it. I was like you said too, I don’t believe in conspiracy theories. I’m very science and logic-based and I didn’t take it seri– I didn’t think it was real. I thought all these videos were hoaxes, people are doing it, like you said, for social media fame, and I tried it and it’s true. It definitely stuck. And it wasn’t — these people, I don’t know if they’re using magnets. I used actually different types of metals and it definitely did stick and it pulsated through my arm and shot up pain to the back of my neck and then within minutes, I get this really strange and strong metallic taste in my mouth.

Ball:

So when you do it, strange taste in your mouth, metallic, like when you get a b12 shot and we taste that metal penny taste, right? In your mouth, like from when you were a kid. Who didn’t put a penny in their mouth, right? And then you’re getting a little pain in the arm, but then you feel a pulsation where it’s at. I know you said it’s uncomfortable, and we’re almost out of time, and we’ve shown your video while you were speaking, we showed it before you came on, but I will ask you, and I know you said eh, maybe, I don’t know. People are still going to think the video is fake, Dan had her on, what is heck is going on? So which arm was it? Was it your left arm?

Miller:

Right here. 

Ball:

It was that arm, would you mind doing it for me and my viewers so I can see it? Because I’m still going, I’m sorry, I don’t buy the video. 

Miller:

So this is a pretty strong metal key hook, and I put it right here and it just sort of hangs, if you can see. It hangs. And I’m moving. So there’s no reason to lie. 

Ball:

Put it on your other arm for me.

Miller:

See? 

Ball:

Okay. 

Miller:

Nothing. Nothing. And so right here, this is a heavier — this is a bracelet clasp and it just kind of just sticks. Even when I move [clasp falls off] — well, when I move vigorously, obviously, but right there, it just sticks. 

Ball:

And that’s where you got the shot? 

Miller:

Exactly where I got the shot. And it can even stick sometimes back here too. Like, it’ll just pulsate. All the way. It’s like this section. So … And my arm is almost —

Ball:

Your arm is straight down right now, I see it. [metal falls off] Now it fell off, but it still hung for a bit and the other one didn’t. Like said, I keep an open mind about everything, because I don’t know, and I haven’t got the shot, I’m not going to take the shot. So, Amelia, I wish you the best, I hope you feel better. I don’t know what to say. I’m speechless. I’m just going to end the interview right there, and say thank you for telling your story, because it gets just more information out there and people asking questions about the legitimacy of this shot, how well does it work? 

Miller:

Agreed. I think we all just want answers. We do. 

Ball:

Amelia Miller, thanks for coming on the program, appreciate it.  

Miller:

Thank you so much, thank you for having me, goodbye.

Ball:

So there you go, folks. It’s up to you. Believe it or not.

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