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Once He Punished Tacklers. Now Herschel Walker Runs Over The Truth

When he was a college and pro running back, the playbook for Herschel Walker was simple: power straight ahead. In his football afterlife, however, Walker seems to be on a more circuitous path – especially when it comes to telling the political truth.

CNN’s Daniel Dale has documented and fact-checked scores of false conspiracy theories Walker has espoused on Fox News and other media outlets, as well as to his more than 445,000 followers on Twitter. Walker recently moved back to Georgia from his home in Texas to try to grab the Republican nomination and run against Sen. Raphael Warnock.

Dale found that the 59-year-old Walker has become as prolific an evader of the truth as he was a punishing yard-gaining running back. His false utterances began even before the Nov. 3 election. Here are a few examples.

In a Twitter video in September, Walker pushed a confusing and baseless conspiracy theory about money being sent from the Chinese government to Black Lives Matter and then “to the Democratic Party.” “Why does it seem like I’m the only one that’s coming up with this?” Walker said in the video.

Dale writes, “Perhaps because the theory doesn’t make sense. Walker’s claim relied on a fundamental misunderstanding of ActBlue — an online fundraising platform for a wide variety of Democratic candidates and progressive entities — and, if we were understanding him correctly, a false claim that a Chinese-American group in California is a ‘company from China.’ ”

On November 8, Walker tweeted, “Anyone using HAMMER SCORECARD to alter voting in our America election should be prosecuted.” Nobody used anything called “HAMMER SCORECARD” to alter votes in the election. That is an utterly baseless conspiracy theory about supposed vote-stealing software created by US intelligence. Its origin has been traced to a man with a history of making false claims. Trump-appointed top cybersecurity official Chris Krebs, who Trump fired, called Hammer and Scorecard claims “a hoax,” “nonsense,” and “not a real thing.”

As of late November Walker was still a fan of Sidney Powell. Even after Trump distanced himself from her following her false claims about Dominion Voting Systems, Walker was undeterred, tweeting, “I still have faith in Sidney Powell” and “All you Doubters will be shocked when @SidneyPowell1 lays the SMACKDOWN on many of the people you have trusted for years!”

During a Fox News appearance in December, Walker said, “I can guarantee you, Joe Biden didn’t get 50 million people voting for him. But yet people think that he’s won this election.” President Biden did win the election, but not with 50 million votes – with more than 81 million votes.

On Jan. 4, two days before Congress met to count the 2020 electoral votes, Walker falsely alleged in a tweet that there was “Country wide election fraud.” Senior officials from the Trump administration, including former attorney general Bill Barr, declared that there was no massive, outcome-changing fraud in the election, but Walker repeatedly insisted there was and that unspecified people had manipulated the election.

In a tweet on Jan. 6, after the U.S. Capitol was attacked by pro-Trump rioters, Walker said he wanted Trump to get to the bottom of “who stole this election.”

In another Jan. 6 tweet, Walker falsely suggested that the the insurrectionists rampaging throughout the Capitol weren’t actually Trump supporters. He called them “Trojan horses” and said “they do not look like MAGA.”



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