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New Report Details How White Supremacy Threatens The World ‘Like Never Before’

A new study from the Anti-Defamation League details how white supremacists from different sides of the Atlantic Ocean are increasing their communications with one another, dialogues which have led to a “normalization” of flagrant bigotry and hate crimes among those involved.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The report, released this week, stated that white supremacy is being internationalized in a way “like never before,” Newsweek reported.

The report by the ADL was created in part to help understand how these disturbing dialogues are functioning — and what role they have in increases in hate crimes seen in both Europe and America.

“As white supremacy grows and connects across borders, it has become essential to understand how followers are growing their networks and recruiting new members,” Sharon Nazarian, ADL senior vice president for international affairs, explained. “On both sides of the Atlantic, racist and xenophobic views are seeping into mainstream social discourse.”

White supremacists are “emboldened,” Nazarian added, as they “see themselves as part of a global movement to ‘save the white race.'”

The report details how discussions and interactions between individuals and groups on both sides of the Atlantic have led to normalization of hate and crimes against minorities among the groups.

“European and American adherents are learning from each other, supporting each other and reaching new audiences,” the report detailed. “They feel empowered and emboldened because they perceive that they are influencing the political climate and reaching disaffected whites.”

FBI statistics demonstrate that the number of hate crime incidents have increased over the past few years. From 2014 to 2017 (the most recent year for which data is available), the total number of hate crimes committed in the United States increased by about 31 percent.

While not every hate crime committed is done by a white supremacist, the Department of Justice wrote in 2017 that the majority of hate crime offenders (50.7 percent) were white individuals (a little over 19 percent of incidents listed the assailant’s race as “unknown”).

Fifty-eight percent of hate crimes were committed because the criminal had a bias against a victim’s race or ethnicity, while 22 percent of crimes were committed because of religious reasonings. Almost 16 percent had to do with a person’s sexual orientation.



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