fbpx

Most View Trump’s Tweets Attacking Congresswomen As Un-American And Racist, Poll Finds

President Donald Trump is not viewed well by the American people following comments he made on social media that many have deemed as racist.

Per previous reporting from HillReporter.com, Trump attacked four Democratic Congresswomen of color, telling them that they could to “go back” to their countries of origin if they didn’t like how things were in the U.S.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Three of the four women Trump lashed out against —Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, and Ayanna Presley — were born in America. The fourth individual, Rep. Ilhan Omar, was born in Somalia but emigrated to the U.S. when she was 12. She became a U.S. citizen at age 17, and has been a naturalized citizen longer than Trump’s wife, first lady Melania Trump.

Over the weekend, Trump wrote:

“So interesting to see ‘Progressive’ Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world (if they even have a functioning government at all), now loudly and viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run. Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came. Then come back and show us how it is done.”

According to a USA Today/Ipsos poll conducted on Monday and Tuesday, 59 percent of respondents viewed those comments, and subsequent ones from the president defending them, as un-American. Democrats were more likely to view them as such, with 88 percent saying so, while 54 percent of Independents agreed. Only 25 percent of Republicans viewed Trump’s comments as un-American.

A larger proportion found Trump’s words to be racist. Sixty-five percent in the poll said that telling people of color to “go back where they came from” was a racist statement. Even a plurality of Republicans (45 percent) admitted that was a racist trope.

But Republicans overall are skeptical of calling out racism when they see it. Seventy percent said that when accusations of racism are made, they’re typically done so in “bad faith,” the poll found.  And while only 28 percent of Americans overall said they agreed with Trump’s controversial tweets, 9-in-10 Republican respondents said they agreed with them.

Still, most Americans rejected Trump’s major talking point. The president has tried to say that those four Congresswomen specifically, and anyone else who holds similar views, are un-American for criticizing his administration and the way things are presently in the country. Thirty percent agreed with his assessment, while 42 percent disagreed (25 percent neither agreed nor disagreed).

Meanwhile, 72 percent of respondents in the poll said that it’s patriotic to point out America’s shortcomings or where we as a nation should try to do better.

The poll may be rejected by Trump in the days ahead, if it comes to his attention: earlier this week, Trump lashed out at polls he said were “fake,” even though he didn’t provide any evidence to suggest as much. The polls he attacked had shown him with negative approval ratings.

On Tuesday, lawmakers in the House of Representatives voiced their disapproval of the president’s comments, with a resolution vote condemning them, the New York Times reported. The vote was largely along party lines within the Democratic-led chamber, although four Republicans (and newly-minted independent Rep. Justin Amash, a former Republican) crossed the aisle to condemn Trump’s words as well.



Follow Us On: Facebook and Twitter