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Minneapolis PD’s Chief Gives Damning Testimony Against Chauvin

As the Derek Chauvin murder trial progresses, eyewitness testimony is proving to be the most vital part of the prosecution’s case against the police officer accused of murdering George Floyd. Chauvin’s defense team is struggling to keep their case afloat amidst the compelling and often heartwrenching accounts of the more than nine minutes Chauvin was filmed kneeling on Floyd’s neck. Last week, jurors heard from 19 people, including several who witnessed Floyd’s death and broke down in tears as they described their attempts to intervene on his behalf.

The televised trial caused even more of a stir on Monday when Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo took the stand. Arradondo testified about police training and tactics but wasn’t allowed to discuss the firing of Chauvin. However, Chief Arradondo told the court Monday that former officer Chauvin’s restraint of George Floyd “absolutely” violates department policy and goes against “our ethics and our values.”

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – MAY 30: A protester holds a sign with a photo of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin during demonstrations following the death of George Floyd on May 30, 2020, in Los Angeles, California. Chauvin was taken into custody for Floyd’s death. Chauvin has been accused of kneeling on Floyd’s neck as he pleaded with him about not being able to breathe. Floyd was pronounced dead a short while later. Chauvin and 3 other officers, who were involved in the arrest, were fired from the police department after a video of the arrest was circulated. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Katie Blackwell, who led departmental training, told the court Monday she selected Chauvin as a field training officer. Police departments use field training officers as mentors and trainers for younger officers or cadets. In Minneapolis, after completing police academy training, cadets do months of field training in which they partner with veteran training officers. Blackwell testified that she selected Chauvin as a training officer. During his testimony, Chief Arradondo made it clear that Chauvin’s behavior wasn’t and isn’t reflective of the training their officers receive.

“This is not what we teach,” Chief Arradondo said when speaking of Chauvin’s behavior.

 

The doctor who provided emergency care to Floyd at Hennepin County Medical Center was the first person to testify Monday morning. He testified that at the time of the incident, he believed Floyd died from a lack of oxygen, rather than an overdose or heart attack, based on the information he had.



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