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Lordy, There Are More Tapes: Donald Trump Called COVID-19 a “Killer” on April Call With Bob Woodward

President Donald Trump referred to COVID-19 as “horrible” and “unbelievable” and a “killer” during multiple phone calls with Bob Woodward in April, newly released recordings of the conversations have revealed.

Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images

“It’s a horrible thing,” Trump confessed to Woodward on April 6. “It’s unbelievable.”

Then, on April 13, Trump again acknowledged that he has been fully aware of how dangerous COVID-19 is.

“This thing is a killer if it gets you,” Trump said. “If you’re the wrong person, you don’t have a chance,” the president added. “So this rips you apart. It is the plague.”

“Yes, yes, exactly,” Woodward replied. “This is a scourge.”

In a series of tapes released last week, Trump is heard admitting to Woodward that he deliberately misled the public about the severity of the coronavirus pandemic, which as of today has killed 195,000 Americans, because he wanted to avoid a panic.

But the crisis is not only accelerating in the United States, which with only 4.25 percent of the world’s population is grappling with 22 percent of COVID-19 cases and 21 percent of global deaths.

The World Health Organization reported on Monday that the number of cases had increased worldwide by 306,857 on Saturday and 307,930 on Sunday, the biggest spikes since the pandemic began.

WHO Chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus noted in a video call that more cases are typically reported on the weekends and then tend to dip by mid-week.

“Lives and livelihoods have been lost, the global economy is in recession and social and political fault lines have been exposed,” Tedros said at the organization’s European regional committee. “We are by no means out of the woods.”

Over 29 million people around the world have been infected, and almost 926,000 people have died, according to the latest data from the WHO.

More than half of the global confirmed coronavirus cases – 14,903,801 and counting – are in the Americas. Europe’s tally jumped by 48,921 on Sunday alone.

“The average daily number of cases in the region is now higher than it was during the first peak in March,” Tedros said.

“Fortunately, the number of deaths appears to be remaining at a relatively low level — for now,” he added. “But every death is a tragedy, and there can be no room for complacency. If we do not keep transmission in check, more people will lose their lives, and there is the real risk of re-introducing so-called lockdown measures that have been so costly.”



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