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Like Amy Coney Barrett, Clarence Thomas Also Claims That He Isn’t Political

In 1991, Clarence Thomas was placed on the United States Supreme Court. His nomination was not without controversy. 52 senators, however, decided to ignore the sexual harassment claims levied by Anita Hill and vote to push Thomas through.

WASHINGTON – APRIL 12: Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas appears before a subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee April 12, 2005 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Thomas and fellow Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy appeared before the committee to discuss the Supreme Court’s 2006 budget requests. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

And since he’s been on the bench, Thomas has regularly taken the Conservative side of things. In fact, multiple studies have found Thomas to be the most Conservatve justice on the court. Still, like fellow judge Amy Coney-Barrett, he doesn’t consider himself to be a partisan hack at all.

During a recent speech at the University of Notre Dame, Thomas told attendees, “I think the media makes it sound as though you are just always going right to your personal preference. So if they think you are anti-abortion or something personally, they think that’s the way you always will come out. They think you’re for this or for that. They think you become like a politician.”

Thomas continued

“When we begin to venture into the legislative or executive branch lanes, those of us, particularly in the federal judiciary with lifetime appointments, are asking for trouble. I think that is problematic and hence the craziness during my confirmation was one of the results of that. It was absolutely about abortion — a matter I had not thought deeply about at the time.”



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