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GOP Could Split Between Donald Trump and Mike Pence in 2024

Former President Donald Trump is considering running for a second term in 2024 without ex-Vice President Mike Pence on the ticket, Bloomberg News reported on Wednesday.

Mike Pence holds Trump rally, a full months after the election.
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

According to Bloomberg, some of Trump’s advisers think he would have a better shot at winning the GOP’s presidential nomination if his running mate is either a woman or Black.

Three sources close to Trump hinted that there are two leading contenders: South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem and Tim Scott of South Carolina – the only Black Republican in the Senate – whom Trump endorsed for reelection on Tuesday.

Jason Miller, a veteran Trump confidant, told Bloomberg that “Trump hasn’t made any decisions regarding a potential 2024 run, but the buried lede here is that the media can’t stop talking about him,” and Bloomberg stressed that Trump has not given “serious consideration of future vice presidential candidates yet,” noting that he is unlikely to choose anyone before the summer of 2023.

The perplexingly servile relationship between Trump and Pence frayed, perhaps irreconcilably, when Pence refused to follow Trump’s orders to block the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory in the Electoral College on January 6th, which was temporarily disrupted by the violent siege on the United States Capitol that same day.

That rift has thusly compounded growing curiosity about who will carry the GOP’s torch in 2024.

Trump, Bloomberg pointed out, is still the party’s frontrunner should he choose to go for it. But Pence leads the pack in Trump’s absence, with 36 percent support among their base. Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX), for comparison, has only 12 percent support.

Pence and his family narrowly escaped assassination by the mob that was instructed by Trump to lay waste to the headquarters of Congress, that has not stopped Pence from peddling Trump’s lie that the 2020 election was stolen.

But because so many GOP voters insist that Trump was cheated out of what they believe was his divine right to the presidency, the battle for the crown may boil down to the two once-unified candidates, and could fracture the already troubled Republican Party beyond repair.



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