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German Poll: Trump Is Bigger Threat To Democracy Than Kim Jong Un, Vladimir Putin

A poll of German residents finds that, among world leaders who are viewed as authoritarian and anti-democratic, most still believe President Donald Trump, the supposed leader of the free world, poses the biggest threat to world peace.

Miquel Benitez/Getty Images

Trump’s “honor” as most dangerous world leader among German citizens queried in a YouGov poll finds that there’s no contest for him with regards to that distinction — he comes in first place within the poll, with 41 percent of Germans saying so. In a distant second-place ranking, Kim Jong Un is viewed by 17 percent of Germans as the most dangerous leader.

Russia President Vladimir Putin and Iran Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei round up the third-place position, with bother receiving 8 percent of Germans saying they’re the most dangerous. China’s President Xi Jinping is in fifth place, with 7 percent of German citizens voting him as deserving the title.

This poll seemingly contradicts what the Trump administration said earlier this year. In a November Facebook post from the White House’s official account page, it was declared by the administration that Trump had restored “respect for America on the world stage.”

The post also derided Democrats, saying that they were an embarrassment to the nation and the world. It’s unclear whether that’s true or not, as polling on leaders around the world generally focuses on who the head-of-state is, and not the legislative components of a particular country.

However, comparing Trump to his predecessor, former President Barack Obama (a Democrat), demonstrates that views of the president across the globe had diminished since Obama left and Trump came to power.

A Pew Research poll from 2018 found that only 27 percent of individuals from around the world had a positive view of Trump.

Among Germans, 86 percent had a high approval rating for Obama as he exited office in 2016, Pew found. By 2018, the second year of Trump’s presidency, only 10 percent of Germans had confidence in U.S. leadership.