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Georgia High School That Suspended Students for Tweeting Pictures of Packed Hallways Has Coronavirus Outbreak

Less than a week after the suspension of two Georgia students who tweeted photos of hallways packed with maskless students went viral, North Pauling High School will be closed for cleaning and classes will shift online after six students and three staff members tested positive for COVID-19.

Source: @Freeyourmindkid/Twitter

In a letter sent to families living in the school district, Superintedent Brian Otott outlined the new, temporary policy.

“No in-person instruction” on Monday, August 10, Otott wrote. “Teachers will post assignments to Canvas on Monday morning. No extra-curricular activities.”

The closure will continue into Tuesday. For beyond then, the school will take things day by day.

“No in-person instruction. Students participate in Digital Learning remotely. No extra-curricular activities,” the letter stated. “Tuesday evening parents and students will be notified of whether Digital Learning will continue, or if inperson instruction may resume. On Monday and Tuesday, the school will be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected, and the district will consult with the Department of Public Health to assess the environment and determine if there any additional close contacts for confirmed cases who have not already been identified.”

The infected individuals had been in the school “for at least a week,” according to Otott.

This was a completely preventable situation.

Georgia is one of the dozens of states experiencing a surge in coronavirus cases. As of today, the state’s case count has surpassed 216,000. The death toll crossed the 4,200 mark.

These grim statistics have undoubtedly been amplified by Republican Governor Brian Kemp, who has refused to mandate masks and has softened social gathering restrictions despite ongoing warnings from public health experts and an explosion in cases.

Last month, Kemp sued the city of Atlanta for mandating masks one day after voiding mandates in 15 other cities.

“Governor Kemp must be allowed, as the chief executive of this state, to manage the public health emergency without Mayor Bottoms issuing void and unenforceable orders which only serve to confuse the public,” the lawsuit states.



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