fbpx

Elizabeth Warren Targets Trump’s Sister As Part Of Anti-Corruption Proposals

A Democratic Party candidate for president is citing President Donald Trump’s older sister as part of her own plank to end corruption in government.

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In April 2019, Maryanne Trump-Barry, who at the time served as a federal appellate judge, resigned from office after allegations surfaced that she may have violated ethics rules by participating in what reporting from the New York Times described as “dubious tax schemes” with her siblings in the 1990s. Trump-Barry’s resignation caused the ethics investigation to cease from carrying on.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts), who is running for president hoping to capture the nomination of the Democratic Party for the 2020 contests, pointed to Trump-Barry’s circumstances and proposed in a Medium post that such ethics investigations should not end even after the official resigns from office.

Warren proposed ending the condition that allows “federal judges to escape investigations for misconduct by stepping down from their post.”

“Under my plan, investigations will remain open until their findings are made public and any penalties for misconduct are issued,” Warren explained.

Per reporting from The Daily Beast, Warren did not go after Trump-Barry solely in her opinion piece on the issue. She also cited a federal appeals judge named Alex Kozinski, who eluded ethics charges regarding sexual misconduct allegations after he, too, resigned from his post.

Warren also pointed to allegations of “sexual assault and perjury complaints against Brett Kavanaugh were dismissed when he was confirmed to the Supreme Court.”

Warren’s Medium post did not focus entirely on anti-corruption within the judicial branch alone. It was, in fact, part of a larger package of anti-corruption reforms the senator is pushing in her bid to become president, which also includes restricting lobbyists from making political contributions, and barring members of Congress from serving on boards for for-profit organizations, among several other proposals.



Follow Us On: Facebook and Twitter