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El Paso Shooter Admonished ‘Race Mixing’ In Manifesto, Spoke Highly Of Trump In Social Media

A shooter who killed at least 19 individuals and injured dozens more in a Walmart near the Cielo Vista Mall in El Paso, Texas, on Saturday reportedly left a manifesto behind in which he ascribed to white nationalist viewpoints.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The shooter was identified as Patrick Crusius, 21, of Dallas Texas. Within his manifesto, portions of which are discussed in reporting from NewsOne, Crusius spoke of his opposition to “race mixing,” as well as his support of genocide as a means to reach his ends.

The shooter also spoke in favor to the idea of “send them back,” referring to immigrants and legal U.S. citizens who were born abroad who may voice dissatisfaction with this administration’s policies. A variation of such a chant was recently repeated by supporters of President Donald Trump during a political rally he hosted last month.

Read more about the “send her back” chants:

Trump Says He Tried To Stop ‘Send Her Back’ Chants — Video From His Rally Suggests Otherwise

Social media postings discovered online, purportedly from the assailant, also demonstrate he was an ardent supporter of Trump and his ideas, including expressing vociferous support of extending a wall between the border of the United States and Mexico.

Washington Examiner reporter Anna Giaritelli posted an alleged picture of the shooter as he was being driven away by law enforcement.

This is the second mass shooting to occur within a week which involves a shooter who espoused white supremacist viewpoints. As previous reporting from HillReporter.com noted, another shooter, who targeted and killed individuals in Gilroy, California, promoted a book in his social media entitled “Might is Right,” which is often cited by far-right extremists with similar bigoted opinions.

Even as individuals like this most recent mass shooter in El Paso directly quote President Donald Trump and some of his ideals directly before their acts of violence, Trump himself has in the past dismissed the idea that his rhetoric has inspired such actions.

In fact, in November last year, Trump put the blame elsewhere. Responding to a question from a reporter who asked whether his rhetoric bore any responsibility for a number of violent attacks, Trump asserted it was the media, in fact, who should be blamed.

“You know what, you’re creating violence by your question. You are creating. You,” Trump said, per reporting from NBC News.



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