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Dem Candidates Push For Impeachment After Trump Says He’d Take Dirt From Foreign Governments

Some Democratic candidates for president are renewing their calls for President Donald Trump to face the possibility of impeachment after his recent comments to ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

In an interview that was released on Wednesday, the president answered in the affirmative when asked whether he’d accept oppositional research from a foreign government on one of his political adversaries in the 2020 presidential campaign, previous reporting from HillReporter.com detailed.

In addition to saying he’d take the information, Trump was incredulous with the idea that he should report such details to the authorities, a move that his own FBI director Chris Wray said was the proper measure to take when such a situation might occur.

Trump said his FBI director was wrong.

“I don’t think in my whole life I’ve ever called the FBI. In my whole life. You don’t call the FBI,” he added.

Trump was also adamantly opposed to the idea that someone might refuse to even look at “dirt” that may be obtained by a campaign from a foreign power, as Democratic candidate Al Gore did in 2000.

“Give me a break. Life doesn’t work that way,” Trump said.

His comments drew ire from Democratic candidates hoping to unseat him in 2020, with several taking to Twitter to express their disdain, as well as a need to begin impeachment proceedings against Trump.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-New York) tweeted out a simple message, saying it was “time for Congress to begin impeachment hearings.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) was more detailed in her calls for impeachment, connecting Trump’s remarks to the broader Mueller report, which detailed his campaign’s attempts to get such “dirt” from a Russian lawyer, as well as Trump’s attempts to obstruct the inquiry itself.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) stated that impeachment should begin because Trump believes he is “above the law.”

And former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) explained the need to move ahead on such inquiries, too. “I think the president’s answer…underscores the importance of moving forward with impeachment,” O’Rourke said.

Impeachment requires a majority of the House of Representatives to concur that a president has committed “high crimes and misdemeanors,” a phrase that does not actually mean a president has had to commit a statutory criminal action for consideration of impeachment to move forward. After the House votes in favor of impeachment, two-thirds of the Senate must vote to indict the president in order to remove them from office, according to the U.S. Constitution.



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