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COVID-19 Pandemic Officially the Deadliest in American History

The number of Americans who have died as a result of COVID-19 has surpassed the fatalities that occurred during the influenza outbreak a century ago, thus elevating the coronavirus pandemic to the deadliest in our nation’s history.

Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

As of Monday, 692,131 persons in the United States have lost their lives to SARS-COV-2 and related complications – more than any other country on Earth – according to data from Worldometer.info’s COVID Tracker. By comparison, approximately 675,000 Americans died from the so-called Spanish flu that proceeded the end of World War I between 1918-1919, per estimates calculated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And while official figures vary – Johns Hopkins University, for example, appraises the death toll to be at least 675,000 – there is no doubt that the coronavirus is tightening its grip.

Sadly, these grim statistics are only expected to increase in the coming months due to lagging vaccination rates among hesitant Americans and the spreading of COVID variants such as Delta.

“Winter may bring a new surge, with the University of Washington’s influential model projecting an additional 100,000 or so Americans will die of COVID-19 by Jan. 1, which would bring the overall U.S. toll to 776,000,” the Associated Press noted on Monday. The actual total could very well prove to be higher.

“Just under 64% of the U.S. population has received as least one dose of the vaccine, with state rates ranging from a high of approximately 77% in Vermont and Massachusetts to lows around 46% to 49% in Idaho, Wyoming, West Virginia, and Mississippi,” AP added. “Globally, about 43% of the population has received at least one dose, according to Our World in Data, with some African countries just beginning to give their first shots.”



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