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Chick-Fil-A Drops Its Charitable Support For Two Anti-LGBTQ Organizations

Chick-fil-A, a notoriously pro-Christian Atlanta-based fast-food restaurant, announced on Monday that it would no longer give charitable donations to groups that promoted an anti-LGBTQ agenda.

Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

According to ABC News, a spokeswoman for the company said that the restaurant has fulfilled its “multi-year commitments to” two organizations it had donated to in the past that sparked controversy: The Salvation Army and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

Although The Salvation Army has made attempts at trying to make itself seem more inclusive in recent years, the history of the organization’s bigoted sentiments is long and concerning, according to reporting from HuffPost. The Fellowship of Christian Athletes, meanwhile, openly promotes an anti-LGBTQ agenda.

The company has announced that in the future it will only give to charities that are based on addressing education, homelessness, and hunger.

It seems that protests and boycott campaigns by LGBTQ groups and their allies may have led to the change in policy by the company. One executive said that the business had spent too many years “taking it on the chin,” referring to those protests hurting the company’s image, the New York Post reported.

Regarding the change in donations it gives, Chick-fil-A President Tim Tassopoulos said that the company “needed to be clear about” its message moving forward.

The restaurant became something of a rallying cry for many in conservative circles to support in recent years. In June of this year, for instance, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed into law legislation that forbade any city in the state from banning the restaurant, or any other company, from creating establishments within their jurisdictions on the basis of companies supporting religious groups with donations.

The legislation was appropriately nicknamed the “Save Chick-fil-A” bill, according to prior reporting from HillReporter.com.



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