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BREAKING: Michael Cohen’s Sentencing Memos Released – Read Them here



Moments ago, the Southern District of New York, as well as the Special Counsel’s office, released sentencing memorandums for former Trump attorney, friend and deputy finance chairman of the Republican National Committee, Michael Cohen.

The separate memos clearly outline the suggested sentence by prosecutors for a judge who will officially sentence Mr. Cohen next Tuesday, December 12. The purpose of the memo is to detail reasons why a lighter or heavier sentence should be considered based on cooperation or lack of cooperation by Mr. Cohen.

Federal prosecutors in Manhattan are asking for a 3.5-year sentence and have requested that Cohen pay a $100,000 fine. Cohen, in August, pleaded guilty in the Southern District of New York to eight federal crimes, including tax fraud, bank fraud, and campaign finance violations. Cohen, who said he was acting on the behest of Donald Trump, faced up to 65 years in prison if found guilty of those crimes.

Based on reports coming from various individuals with knowledge of the investigation and of Cohen’s legal standing, the former Trump attorney has been cooperating extensively with investigators over the last several months. Cohen reportedly met with the special counsel’s office for over 70 hours, starting in early August, right before his first guilty plea on eight felony counts, and continuing for many weeks thereafter.  Cohen has since pleaded guilty on an additional count of lying to investigators.

Michael Cohen’s complete sentencing memorandums are available below:

Special Counsel:
SCO-Cohen-Sentencing-Submission

Southern District of New York
Cohen Sentencing Memo

In the New York memo, prosecutors painted a less than stellar picture of Cohen’s cooperation:

“[Cohen] was motivated to do so by personal greed, and repeatedly used his power and influence for deceptive ends. Now he seeks extraordinary leniency – a sentence of no jail time – based principally on his rose-colored view of the seriousness of the crimes.”

The memo continues: 

“But the crimes committed by Cohen were more serious than his submission allows and were marked by a pattern of deception that permeated his professional life.”