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Are People Really Taking Veterinary Drugs For COVID? One Poison Control Center Shares Numbers

If a person is afraid to take a vaccine approved — for emergency use, and now in Pfizer’s case, fully — by the FDA, because they don’t know what’s in it, that person would definitely never buy a bottle of medicine intended for large farm animals and take that instead, right? Right? Wrong.

YINAN, CHINA – AUGUST 17 2021: A view of cows in a dairy farm in Yinan county in east China's Shandong province Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2021. (Photo credit should read Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Like when Trump mused about the possibility of using disinfectants or bleach to kill COVID-19 (since it works on hard surfaces) poison control centers are seeing the effects.

There’s no official number defining exactly how many people have chosen to ingest ivermectin — a drug that is available by prescription for humans, or from feed stores for farm animals — to combat COVID-19. However, there’s definite interest, with people discussing the drug across forums and comment sections.

One number that is available comes from Mississippi Poison Control Center, and again doesn’t confirm how many people have actually gone to their local feed store and dosed up, only that a lot of people are considering it, at least.

According to Alternet, 70% of the calls the organization has received recently are about ivermectin, although it’s not clear how many are post-ingestion calls, and how many are asking for advice pre-emptively.

The FDA explains that while ivermectin is approved to treat certain parasites in humans, a bottle intended for livestock will have a different concentration, and may have different amounts of inactive ingredients, and is not approved or considered safe for human consumption. They’re also warning that even ivermectin intended for humans can have side effects and should only be taken under the guidance of a medical professional.



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