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Andrew Napolitano Reminds Colleagues: Before Past Weekend, Bolton Was A ‘Conservative Icon’ To Them

As news reports detailed an excerpt from former National Security Advisor John Bolton’s forthcoming book, describing how he said President Donald Trump told him that military aid being held up from Ukraine was meant to coerce that nation to investigate Trump’s own political rivals, calls for Bolton’s testimony during the impeachment trial in the Senate have intensified.

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Which, of course, has also led to many conservatives in the media deeming Bolton public enemy number 1.

Lou Dobbs, for example, on his Fox Business channel program on Monday, derided Bolton as a “foreign policy RINO,” or “Republican in name only,” The Week reported. He added (with a graphic included) that the former national security advisor had become a “tool for the radical Dems.”

The Orwellian change in demeanor for Bolton did not go unnoticed. Andrew Napolitano, a Fox News legal analyst, himself appeared on Tuesday evening on the same network that Dobbs’s show is on to point out the absurdity of conservatives turning on Bolton.

Napolitano noted that Bolton “used to work here” as an analyst, too, up until Trump appointed him in 2018. Bolton was, in Napolitano’s words, “a conservative icon until two days ago.”

“Now the things they’re saying about him, it sounds like they’re talking about Nancy Pelosi,” Napolitano said, according to HuffPost.

Regardless of how conservative pundits felt about him now, Bolton’s book demonstrated that there was something that needed to be added to get the full picture of what he knew about the president’s actions.

“He has come out with something that goes to the core of the case,” Napolitano added.

At least four Republican senators must join with Democrats and vote in favor of hearing Bolton as a witness, with the possibility of others being heard as well. So far, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he doesn’t have the votes at the moment to stop such a motion from happening within his own Republican-controlled chamber.